moon tree
Moonwise


Moonwise home page Moonwise Calendar Moonwise Diary online ordering
Moonwise on Facebook latest newsletter viewing the sky dates
  live calendar page live diary page site index & links

Saturday 25 October 2014  •   2 Yew Moon 2014


Viewing the night sky in Yew Moon 2014

24 October - 22 November 2014

Map of night sky at full moon: 6 November, 22:23 UT
Northern hemisphere perspective, aligned on the ecliptic. Morning sky to the left, evening to the right.

night sky map for Yew Moon 2014

Saturn is in the western evening sky, and the very new crescent moon is close to it on the evening of 25 October, occulting it over the North Atlantic and nearby lands. As seen from London, the moon covers Saturn while the sun is still up, but Saturn starts to emerge from behind the moon at 18:08 BST and, if you have a good view to the south-western horizon, you may be able to see the thin crescent of the moon and the pale dot of Saturn together in the twilight before they set just over half an hour later. Through a telescope, you should be able to see the ringed planet as it comes out from behind the moon’s barely lit limb. This is the last in this series of Moon-Saturn occultations.

As it does every two years and a bit, Mars hangs on in the western evening sky for months, as it moves through the constellations almost as fast as the sun does. As seen from northern lands, the effect is heightened this year by the fact that it is the season when sunset is getting earlier, though Mars is easier to see from southern lands, being among the southern stars of Sagittarius. The moon is north of Mars on the evening of 28 October.

Mercury comes out again into the morning sky, having passed Earth and the sun. It reaches 18.5°W of the sun on 1 November, and is somewhat easier to see from the northern hemisphere than the south.

The just past full moon passes through the Hyades on the evening of 8 November.

Jupiter rises in the late evening in the prominent constellation Leo, much brighter than its bright star, Regulus. On the night of 14/15 November, the waning half moon forms a pleasant grouping with Jupiter and Regulus.

On 4 November, the moon passes very close to Uranus, and occults it as seen from Iceland and the Faroe Islands. For Reykjavik, the southern edge of the moon covers Uranus from about 17:14 to 17:37 UT. For Tórshavn, the times are 17:16 to 17:28. For Steòrnabhagh (Stornoway) and Lerwick, the moon passes just to the north of the faint planet.

Look out for the Leonid meteors around 17 or 18 November.

The Rosetta probe is due to land on the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 14 November.

Venus passes the far side of the sun on 25 October, and is out of view all month.



The month ahead: Birch Moon 2014/15

23 November - 21 December 2014

Map of night sky at full moon: 6 December, 12:27 UT
Northern hemisphere perspective, aligned on the ecliptic. Morning sky to the left, evening to the right.

night sky map for Birch Moon 2014/15

Mars is in the south-western sky, low down as seen from the north. On the evening of 25 November, the new crescent moon is to its north. The red planet moves on into Capricornus on 4 December.

On the night of 5/6 December, the moon passes through the Hyades.

Jupiter rises brightly in the late evening in the constellation Leo. On the night of 11/12 December, the moon is nearby.

On the morning of 19 December, you may be able to see Saturn below the old moon in the pre-dawn sky. On 20 December, the moon is below Saturn.

At the end of the month, Venus emerges from behind the sun into the evening sky, more easily visible from the southern hemisphere.

On the night of 1/2 December, the moon passes very close to Uranus and occults it as seen from parts of Alaska, Western Canada and the High Arctic. For Juneau, the moon covers Uranus in daylight from 22:41 to 23:14 UT (13:41 to 14:14 AKST). For Uqsuqtuuq (Gjoa Haven), the moon covers Uranus in darkness from 23:09 to 23:38 UT (16:09 to 16:38 MST). For Vancouver and Iqaluit, the moon passes just to the north of the blue ice giant.

Look out for the Geminid meteors around 13 or 14 December.



William Morris
Send feedback